KEY MISTAKES TO AVOID WHEN NAMING YOUR PRODUCTS OR PROGRAMS

mistakes naming products.png
 

I WANTED TO SHARE A FEW MISTAKES I’VE MADE RECENTLY [AND YES THEY’RE AS RECENT AS 6 WEEKS AGO] WHEN IT CAME TO NAMING MY LATEST PRODUCTS. AND I WANTED SHARE THEM SO THAT YOU CAN AVOID MAKING THEM TOO. HERE ARE SOME THOUGHTS AND QUESTIONS YOU NEED TO CONSIDER WHEN NAMING YOUR PROGRAMS OR PRODUCTS.

As you may be aware I recently created and launched my free membership Radical Brand Love.

After a series of brainstorming sessions, I knew as soon as the name came to light, it made sense for what I was offering in the library.

Though I love the name, I thought it would inspire others to sign up and take action, and surprisingly many did. But not everyone understands the word “Brand”. And being at that stage in the business journey the word “brand” can be loosely translated into “branding”.

The offerings in the library are for people wanting to learn the key fundamentals on creating a brand on solid foundations. So I needed to be very clear on who my target audience is for this library, and for someone who is fairly new to the game it would be far more appealing that to someone who’s been doing it for a while.

The name Radical Brand Love stands firm on it’s own and that’s probably why I loved it so much. But I found it difficult to introduce other programs & workshops and have them relevant to one another, as well as the overall picture.

In the end I needed to create a name that’s easily remembered, and identifiable for my audience. And offering three separate programs at launch time could have meant I had to re-invent promotion strategies for each.

However, all is not lost with my RBL instead it will be used in future challenges.

 

SO, How do you name your products or programs

and stay on brand? 

 

The following are a few important questions to ask to ensure you stay on brand and yet still relevant to what you offer and for your audience.

 

INSPIRED ACTION:

Consider the desired outcome for your audience? Where do you see them once they’ve been through your programs, or after they’ve worked with you? How do you want them to feel, be, do? Inspired? Rejuvenated? Radiant?

Avoid acknowledging them where they are now. Think of descriptive name and/or some adjectives that take them where they want to be.

 

STAY ON BRAND:

Remember the words or phrases you choose need to be on brand. What current adjectives have you already got and use for your brand?

Select words that stand the test of time not words that are on trend.

 

HERE'S AN EXAMPLE OF WHAT I MEAN:

Take for instance the word “bloom” I decided to move away from RBL to something a little softer and more feminine and inspires other women in business to bloom and thrive for their brand.

The word bloom can mean several things. For me it’s relevant because I’m also inspired by nature, and yet can mean for my community to flourish and bloom as in growth; radiate for success, as would a flower.

 

There’s no harm in experimenting with your ideas. 

If you have the time and the energy to test things out, then I say go for it.  

But put a time limit on it and then review.

 

In the end I decided the creative library needed to be relevant for both newbies + aspiring entrepreneurs who want to learn to build a brand on solid foundations.

I also needed the name to be relevant to other programs I’m offering. Remember this too, the names you choose now, can they be expanded on if they’re created in the future with other programs and packages, without trying to explain too much with your audience?

You gotta have a relevant theme that’s on brand and on topic, otherwise, it’s just a bundle of confusion.

Avoid generic names like Gold, Silver and Bronze, though you can see each phase for your audience/clients I think we can get a little more creative than this.

Besides generic names don’t really mean or do anything for your clients.

Get your brandstorming hat on and come up with more creative ideas, but be very clear on the name and without being fancy.

By the way, if you’ve been around in my community for a while, the same scenario occurred for Design School. This name was off and easily misinterpreted for entrepreneurs. Instead, I think people saw it as a school for people who wanted to become a fully fledged designer. And sadly I’ve had to let this one go.

In the end I settled on the Bloom Collective - as what I offer is a collection of resources, workshops and the bloom store for creative-solo-entrepreneurs who wish to dive into designing their own, or need quick and easy solutions for building an unstoppable brand.

 

If you're new to all of this, I recommend starting with my free 5 day course Brand to Bloom.

This course will take you through some of the fundamentals of building a personal brand and how you can implement what you've learnt into your website.

[Side note Aug 2018 - this will be back a little later this year.]